Results

Please note:
The following report has been prepared manually by our volunteer staff and may not reflect the answers of all recent respondents.
This is the first of many reports that will be generated from the survey data.

We welcome your questions and comments, and encourage everyone involved in hand papermaking to join this community.

Want to add your information to the community documentation? Take the SURVEY now!

REPORT 2013 MARCH

Here is a brief look at some of the results:

  • we now have completed surveys from 48 individuals and 3 organizations
  • among individual respondents, 85% are from the United States.
  • among individual respondents, one each made her or his first piece of handmade paper in the 1950s and 1960s; fourteen in the 1970s; nine in the 1980s; twelve in the 1990s; and the rest since 2000
  • roughly half of our respondents have studied hand papermaking outside of their own country
  • more than four-fifths of our respondents have taught hand papermaking

1. Which of the following best describes your work in hand papermaking? (check all that apply)

#

Answer

Response

%

1

Artist who uses handmade paper for book arts

 

 

24

51%

2

Artist who uses papermaking for three-dimensional work

 

 

25

53%

3

Artist who uses papermaking for two-dimensional work

 

 

32

68%

4

Collector

 

 

3

6%

5

Educator or researcher who lectures about hand papermaking

 

 

14

30%

6

Educator who teaches hand papermaking (any facet)

 

 

29

62%

7

Production hand papermaker

 

 

8

17%

8

Recreational papermaker (for personal development, non-exhibiting)

 

 

5

11%

9

Researcher making handmade paper

 

 

8

17%

10

Writer on topics related to hand papermaking

 

 

12

26%

11

Other (Please explain)

 

 

12

26%

 

2. How were you introduced to the hand papermaking process? (check the best choice listed)

#

Answer

Response

%

1

An individual

 

 

5

11%

2

Apprenticeship

 

 

1

2%

3

Books

 

 

3

6%

4

Classroom instruction

 

 

15

32%

5

Dialog with peers

 

 

3

6%

6

In-house research (personal experimentation)

 

 

2

4%

7

Other print materials (magazines, newsletters, catalogs)

 

 

0

0%

8

Workshops

 

 

8

17%

9

Other (Please explain)

 

 

10

21%

 

Total

 

47

100%

 

Other (Please explain)

A class in the public library for parents and children

Waterwheel Paperworks, San Francisco, project of Free Medical Clinic

In Walter Hamady’s drawing and letterpress classes at UW Madison

I was working with Camp Fire Girls and they chose hand papermaking for that year’s craft medium.

First Philippine Handmade Paper Conference, Baguio City, Philippines

At Indiana University while in grad school, from Joan Sterrenberg, in a paper making course, and as the technician for the paper studio.

While living in Israel and working mostly with animal fibres through spinning/weaving/tapestry work, I was introduced to a nucleus of papermakers using plant fibres. I switched!!

during textile design degree work at buffalo state college

An article by Henry Morris in The Papermaker

Via the paper industry

 

3. To what degree did the following influence your work in hand papermaking?


image001

 

Question

Primary Influence

Major Influence

Modest Influence

An individual

18

17

6

Apprenticeship

5

3

3

Attending a papermaking conference

3

13

13

Books

4

19

14

Classroom Instruction

10

12

6

Dialog with peers

10

18

9

Dialog with students

2

7

13

Demonstrations

4

14

12

Exhibits – handmade paper

3

12

14

Exhibits – handmade paper art

4

15

9

Field research (visiting papermaking workshops or studios)

7

16

12

In-house research (personal experimentation)

23

17

2

Library research

4

6

14

Ongoing practice and personal experience

27

15

2

Other print materials (magazines, newsletters, catalogs)

4

8

17

Study abroad

10

3

3

Videos

0

5

6

Workshops

12

14

7

Other (Specify below)

6

4

0

 

4. Specify other:

Text Response

Watching how people interacted with my work.

meetings of Dard Hunter Friends

gettting an NEA grant for a study of equipment for hand papermaking in 1976

Working with Combat Paper project and Peace Paper Projects

spent 2 weeks at the Awagami Paper Factory in Japan making paper..primary influence!

Annual gathering of Western members of the Yahoo papermaking group and Social media such as Facebook

The process of papermaking with the mystery that always comes with it

books: Japanese Papermaking and Lillian Bell’s books were HUGE early supports for me

I lived in Japan for 5 years and studied with a master papermaker.

Several individuals rather than just one.

Working in the modern paper industry and a desire to re-create antiquity

 

5. Raw materials (fibers you use)

image002

 

Question

use routinely

use sometmes

abaca – purchased fiber

26

12

cotton linters – purchased fiber

8

21

cotton rag – fiber prepared in house

14

10

cotton rag half-stuff – purchased fiber

6

17

raw cotton – fiber prepared in house

3

2

gampi – fiber prepared in house

4

5

hemp rag – fiber prepared in house

2

4

raw hemp – fiber prepared in house

4

6

kozo< – fiber prepared in house

14

12

mitsumata – fiber prepared in house

1

5

raw flax – fiber prepared in house

8

7

other fiber (specify below)

20

4

 

6. Identify any other fibers you use.

Text Response

Any number of locally gathered garden and roadside plants. Primarily New Zealand flax, but have also used iris, cattail, canary reed grass, spartina, bulrush, crocosmia, palm, yucca, pampas, nettle, plum bast, and pigweed. Also hardy vegetable waste such as garlic and onion tops, pineapple leaves, artichoke sepals, leek tops, and banana stems.

Various plant fibers from gardens, conservatories, yards highways

Garden grown plant fibers, Iris, Daylily, garlic, wheat, oat, seaweed, dune grasses

linen and flax prepared by Twinrocker

retired..not applicable

Kenaf, Roselle, Bagasse

Linen, and a variety of plant fibers harvested in southern california

Iris, sunflower

recycling old clothes: jute, linen,silk

Plant fibers from weeds and straw

anything I can find in the yard/garden.

Vegetable fibers (artichoke, beet, leek), invasive fibers – andean pampas grass seed hair, French broom

Many indigenous fibers used in Hawaii when I took workshops with Marilyn Wold

milkweed

varied plants such as iris, torch ginger, heliconia<, wheat straw, kenaf, ….

Lots of tree and plant fibers

I process fibers from various things I grow including lemongrass.

Linen

junk mail…paper bags

I am using freshly cut abaca, virgin and waste and fresh kozo from my fiber garden at CITC, Marikina, Philippines. Other indigenous fibers like cogon grass.

Sunflower stalk, banana stalk

Plant materials that would normally be tilled into the ground (from the farmers at the Greensboro Farmers Market). Also plant fibers from my garden and friend’s gardens.

Texas kozo (mulberry); lemongrass; ginger; ashe juniper; yucca

recycled fibers, recycled cotton rag from Crane "blue jean" paper, most of the paper I have made in the last years has been in teaching school children as an artist in the schools

collected plants: hosta, daylily, iris, palm, leeks, asparagus, garlic, onions

Plants harvested
locally and prepared at home: New Zealand Flax, Redwood, Mardrone Oak, Wisteria and French Broom, Pampas Grass, Wis

Yucca, Bamboo

recently using old linen tablecloths, rose of sharon bark, and repurposed food prep wastes (like artichoke leaf fiber and corn husks)

have only done VERY rudimentary papermaking, using only scrap paper , junk mail and a few home gathered plants.

Linen rag, sea weed

Mitnan, papyrus, bamboo, wheat, bagasse, switchgrass, banana, kudzu, Johnson Grass, kenaf, sorghum, corn, etc.

slippery elm, cattail, day lily, cedar, hickory, <hosta, canada thistle

Except for the abaca, I beat the fibers by hand

Currently experimenting with old linen rags

Bamboo, Esparto, wood pulp

 

7. If the fibers you use require cooking, what chemicals do you use?

image003

 

Question

use routinely

use sometimes

caustic soda (sodium hydroxide)

8

5

lime (calcium hydroxide)

2

4

soda ash (sodium carbonate)

25

10

other (specify below)

3

2

 

8. Identify any other chemicals you use for cooking.

Text Response

Home prepared wood ash lime

Ginger lilies

wood ash

Wood ash

I do not cook my own

wood ash lye

washing soda

alkaline lye solutions made from vegetable ashes, usually ash from burning various hardwoods

Generally I use pulp sheets

 

9. Identify tools and methods you use for beating and the frequency.

image004

 

Question

use routinely

use sometimes

blender

8

13

hand beating

7

16

Hollander
beater

28

10

naginata beater

2

0

paint
mixer or Whiz Mixer

5

4

other (specify
below)

3

2

 

10. Identify any other tools or methods you use for beating.

Text Response

Hydropulper until it died

I do not beat my own

Babcock/Matag Mixer illustrated in Jules Heller Book " Papermaking"1978, Babcock Bucket Beater, illustrated in Anne Vilsboll book "Papir Mageri" 1990

Critter

Lander Critter if that qualifies as Hollander

I built a hydropulper from an old frig motor, a shaft and a sharpened boat propeller – very effective…

hand beating with wooden mallets

washing during beating (with a drum type washer) is an essential part of our fiber processing for western papermaking

 

11. Identify the style of sheet forming you use.

image005

 

Question

use routinely

use sometimes

Asian style (dipping with formation aid)

12

13

deckle box

7

10

Nepalese style (pouring)

6

12

Western style (dipping without formation aid)

34

8

other (Specify below)

3

2

 

12. Identify any other styles of sheet forming you use.

Text Response

Spraying

pouring

experimental methods similar to pouring, on open screens for organic forms

sprayed sheets

casting with concentrated pulp

western style (dipping "with" formation aid)

"tin can " papermaking, and really simple basic sheet formation using a plastic cross stitch "canvas" screen with no mold at all

pouring base layers, and misting fine colored cotton pulp through spray bottles, over "resists".

 

13. How much does your hand papermaking work contribute to your yearly income?

Answer

Response

a lot

 

 

3

some

 

 

6

a little

 

 

17

none

 

 

15

no comment

 

 

6

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2 thoughts on “Results”

  1. Peter and Donna Thomas said:

    Great to see this info on line.

    Peter Thomas

  2. Suzanne Schumacher said:

    I am looking for someone to teach me papermaking. I live in Murrieta California…north of San Diego by about 50 miles. Would you know of anyone or anywhere that I may get this knowledge?

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